Pauline Theology

 

The Apostle Paul, who wrote two thirds of the New Testament, is perhaps our greatest systematic theologian. Let us look at the Paul’s principle teachings which extends upon the underlying theology of the Gospel of John.

Salvation by Grace through Faith

circumcised on the eighth day, a member of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew born of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee; as to zeal, a persecutor of the church; as to righteousness under the law, blameless.

Yet whatever gains I had, these I have come to regard as loss because of Christ. More than that, I regard everything as loss because of the surpassing value of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things, and I regard them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but one that comes through faith in Christ, the righteousness from God based on faith.   (Phil. 3: 5-9)

Paul relied upon the keeping of the law, as defined by the Pharisees, for his salvation. But that was before his conversion to Christ. He discovered that Jesus had keep the law for him and died for his sins. Paul writes:

 For by grace you have been saved through faith, and this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God— not the result of works, so that no one may boast. For we are what he has made us, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand to be our way of life.   (Ephesians 2:8-9)

Good Works

Interpreting the meaning of good works has proven difficult, even for Martin Luther. His reading of Paul’s Epistle to the Romans caused him to understand that works will not guarantee salvation. Faith, alone, in Christ would suffice. The Book of James was, for him, at odds with Romans. James stated:

What good is it, my brothers and sisters, if you say you have faith but do not have works? Can faith save you? If a brother or sister is naked and lacks daily food, and one of you says to them, “Go in peace; keep warm and eat your fill,” and yet you do not supply their bodily needs, what is the good of that? So faith by itself, if it has no works, is dead.   (James 2:14-17)

Sanctification

Were Paul and James is disagreement about works. Let us examine what Paul wrote in Romans:

What then are we to say? Should we continue in sin in order that grace may abound? By no means! How can we who died to sin go on living in it? Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? Therefore we have been buried with him by baptism into death, so that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life.   (Romans 6:1-4)

Paul is saying that we have been forgiven, but that we should walk in newness of life. That sounds very much like James in a way. Is is important that we do live a righteous life? For Paul, it was. He believed the goal is to live free from sin:

Not that I have already obtained this or have already reached the goal; but I press on to make it my own, because Christ Jesus has made me his own. Beloved, I do not consider that I have made it my own; but this one thing I do: forgetting what lies behind and straining forward to what lies ahead, I press on toward the goal for the prize of the heavenly call of God in Christ Jesus.   (Philippians 3:12-14)

For Paul, salvation by grace through faith was a heavenly call. It was a call which requires a daily response. Paul said that he had not yet achieved this goal. For him, achieving the goal was a struggle. Something within was trying to hold him back:

I do not understand my own actions. For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate. Now if I do what I do not want, I agree that the law is good. But in fact it is no longer I that do it, but sin that dwells within me. For I know that nothing good dwells within me, that is, in my flesh. I can will what is right, but I cannot do it. For I do not do the good I want, but the evil I do not want is what I do. Now if I do what I do not want, it is no longer I that do it, but sin that dwells within me.   (Romans 7:15-20)

Was Paul talking about himself before his conversion? Obviously not. As a Pharisee, he considered himself blameless under the law.

Life in the Spirit

We have been given so that we will no longer be held captive by our sinful nature.

There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has set you free from the law of sin and of death. For God has done what the law, weakened by the flesh, could not do: by sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and to deal with sin, he condemned sin in the flesh, so that the just requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not according to the flesh but according to the Spirit. For those who live according to the flesh set their minds on the things of the flesh, but those who live according to the Spirit set their minds on the things of the Spirit. To set the mind on the flesh is death, but to set the mind on the Spirit is life and peace. For this reason the mind that is set on the flesh is hostile to God; it does not submit to God’s law—indeed it cannot, and those who are in the flesh cannot please God.   (Romans 8:1-8)

Our sinful nature, which Paul describes as the flesh, is still at work in us, if we allow it. We have a choice to make each day: Live by the Spirit or live by the flesh:

Live by the Spirit, I say, and do not gratify the desires of the flesh. For what the flesh desires is opposed to the Spirit, and what the Spirit desires is opposed to the flesh; for these are opposed to each other, to prevent you from doing what you want. But if you are led by the Spirit, you are not subject to the law. Now the works of the flesh are obvious: fornication, impurity, licentiousness, idolatry, sorcery, enmities, strife, jealousy, anger, quarrels, dissensions, factions, envy, drunkenness, carousing, and things like these. I am warning you, as I warned you before: those who do such things will not inherit the kingdom of God.

By contrast, the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. There is no law against such things. And those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. If we live by the Spirit, let us also be guided by the Spirit.   (Galatians 5:16-25)

The solution for winning our battle with sin is to walk with God in the Spirit. The Spirit will guide us, strengthen us against sin, and transforms our lives. But we must make a choice of who will guide us. Paul writes:

But if I build up again the very things that I once tore down, then I demonstrate that I am a transgressor. For through the law I died to the law, so that I might live to God. I have been crucified with Christ; and it is no longer I who live, but it is Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.   (Galatians 2:18-20)

Does Paul’s theology go against any of our church doctrine? If so, perhaps we need to reconsider that doctrine.