Tag Archives: commandments of the Lord

Twelth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 15

Track 1: Asking for Wisdom

1 Kings 2:10-12; 3:3-14
Psalm 111
Ephesians 5:15-20
John 6:51-58

Today, let us look at the place of wisdom in our faith. We read in Proverbs:

Give instruction[a] to the wise, and they will become wiser still;
    teach the righteous and they will gain in learning.
The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom,
    and the knowledge of the Holy One is insight.   (Proverbs 9:9-1:9-10)

God is our teacher. He is wiser than we will ever be. We need to fear him. We need to respect him:. We need to acknowledge his wisdom and understanding.

God spoke through the Prophet Isaiah:

For my thoughts are not your thoughts,
    nor are your ways my ways, says the Lord.
For as the heavens are higher than the earth,
    so are my ways higher than your ways
and my thoughts than your thoughts.   (Isaiah 55:5-6)

But God is ready to teach us wisdom. In the Book of James we read:

If any of you is lacking in wisdom, ask God, who gives to all generously and ungrudgingly, and it will be given you.   (James 1:5)

Solomon was made king of Israel after his father David. But he realized the difficulty of his position:. Reading from 1 Kings:

And now, O Lord my God, you have made your servant king in place of my father David, although I am only a little child; I do not know how to go out or come in. And your servant is in the midst of the people whom you have chosen, a great people, so numerous they cannot be numbered or counted. Give your servant therefore an understanding mind to govern your people, able to discern between good and evil; for who can govern this your great people?”   (1 Kings 3:7-9)

Solomon understood his limitations. How many of us understand ours? God wants us to ask him for help:

It pleased the Lord that Solomon had asked this. God said to him, “Because you have asked this, and have not asked for yourself long life or riches, or for the life of your enemies, but have asked for yourself understanding to discern what is right, I now do according to your word.   (1 Kings 3::10-12)

It pleases God that we ask him things that line up with his word. In his Sermon on the Mount, Jesus said:

Strive first for the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well.   (Matthew 6:33)

God blessed Solomon with wisdom, but he also blessed him with in other ways. God said to him:

I give you also what you have not asked, both riches and honor all your life; no other king shall compare with you. If you will walk in my ways, keeping my statutes and my commandments, as your father David walked, then I will lengthen your life.”   (1 Kings 3:13-14)

Unfortunately, Solomon eventually became distracted by the things of this world. He did not keep the commandments of God. Wisdom, alone, will not save us. We need something even greater than wisdom. We need a relationship with God. We need the saving power of God. In John’s Gospel we read:

He came to what was his own, and his own people did not accept him. But to all who received him, who believed in his name, he gave power to become children of God, who were born, not of blood or of the will of the flesh or of the will of man, but of God.   (John 1:11-13)

How do we access the power of God. We need Jesus living on the inside of us. From today’s Gospel reading:

So Jesus said to them, “Very truly, I tell you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood have eternal life, and I will raise them up on the last day; for my flesh is true food and my blood is true drink. Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood abide in me, and I in them.”   (John 6:53-56)

Solomon had the right idea to ask for wisdom, but he did not rely on God’s help to keep it. If we are wise, we will ask God for his help. He sent Jesus to die for our sins. He paid the price for our sin so that we re empowered to live jn his victory. He is our best help. We need the mind of Christ. We need him abiding in us. His victory is our victory  He is our source of strength and power to overcome this world.

Her is our wisdom. Imagine this, he is living on the inside of us if we have3 made him Lord. He can then direct our thinking and actions.

 

Track 2: Suggetions

Proverbs 9:1-6
Psalm 34:9-14
Ephesians 5:15-20
John 6:51-58

Today’s Old Testament and the Gospel reading talk about a feeding. In Proverbs, wisdom is calling out:

“You that are simple, turn in here!”
    To those without sense she says,
“Come, eat of my bread
    and drink of the wine I have mixed.
Lay aside immaturity, and live,
    and walk in the way of insight.”   (Proverbs 9:4-6)

And in the Gospel:

Jesus said, “I am the living bread that came down from heaven. Whoever eats of this bread will live forever; and the bread that I will give for the life of the world is my flesh.”   (John 6:51)

The first meal is a foretaste of the second. Jesus is the wisdom of God.

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Third Sunday in Lent

The Wisdom of God

In order for us to grasp God’s plan for our salvation we need to understand his wisdom. Worldly wisdom will never understand his plan. The Apostle Paul wrote:

The message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. For it is written,

“I will destroy the wisdom of the wise,
and the discernment of the discerning I will thwart.”   (1 Corinthians 1:18-19)

The key to understanding God’s plan is the cross. It it the very foundation of God’s wisdom. The Pharisees did not understand this. They relied on their own wisdom. They held on to their interpretation of Mosaic Law. But they failed to understand even the law.

The very essence of the Law is that God must be first in our lives. In Exoodus we read

I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery; you shall have no other gods before me.   (Exodus 20:1-2)

The Pharisees replaced God with their own gods. They understood that they must obey the law, but deep now they must have realized that they failed. So they redefined the to be set of rules that they thought they could follow. They made up the rules which they used to judge whether or not someone else was following their rules properly. What they failed to understand was the purpose of why the law was given by God.

The law was powerless to produce righteousness. The Apostle Paul wrote:

 as it is written:

“There is no one who is righteous, not even one;
    there is no one who has understanding,
        there is no one who seeks God.   (Romans 3:10-11)

The law was given so that we might understand what sin is. Again, Paul wrote:

Now before faith came, we were imprisoned and guarded under the law until faith would be revealed. Therefore the law was our disciplinarian until Christ came, so that we might be justified by faith. But now that faith has come, we are no longer subject to a disciplinarian, for in Christ Jesus you are all children of God through faith.   (Galatians 3:23-26)

The law was our schoolmaster. It pointed out the problem. It could not solve the problem. The fulfillment of the law came only through Jesus. Jesus said:

“Do not think that I have come to abolish the law or the prophets; I have come not to abolish but to fulfill. For truly I tell you, until heaven and earth pass away, not one letter, not one stroke of a letter, will pass from the law until all is accomplished.   (Matthew 5:17-18)

Jesus fulfilled the law by the cross. He lived the righteous life that God, the Father, required of us. And he bore our sins upon the cross and took the punishment for them which we deserved. He became our Temple by making a sacrifice for our sins once and for all. In today’s Gospel we find Jesus cleansing the Temple by throwing out the money changers:

The Jews then said to him, “What sign can you show us for doing this?” Jesus answered them, “Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up.” The Jews then said, “This temple has been under construction for forty-six years, and will you raise it up in three days?” But he was speaking of the temple of his body. After he was raised from the dead, his disciples remembered that he had said this; and they believed the scripture and the word that Jesus had spoken.   (John 2:18-22)

The cross was and is both the wisdom and power of God. The Apostle Paul wrote:

Where is the one who is wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world? For since, in the wisdom of God, the world did not know God through wisdom, God decided, through the foolishness of our proclamation, to save those who believe. For Jews demand signs and Greeks desire wisdom, but we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those who are the called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God.   (1 Corinthians 1:20-24)

The Pharisees were governed by a “worldly” wisdom, which was not a wisdom at all. It is a wisdom promised to us by Satan. He told Eve that if she ate the fruit of the tree of knowledge she would be wise, like God. This was a lie. The Apostle Paul contrasted the wisdom of God and of the world.

Yet among the mature we do speak wisdom, though it is not a wisdom of this age or of the rulers of this age, who are doomed to perish. But we speak God’s wisdom, secret and hidden, which God decreed before the ages for our glory. None of the rulers of this age understood this; for if they had, they would not have crucified the Lord of glory.   (1 Corinthians 2:6-8)

The best that the worldly wisdom could do was to “crucify the Lord of glory.”

Which wisdom are we operating from today? The world’s or God’s? We need to ask ourselves: Are we attempting to lesson the requirements of God’s law? We need the law to help us grasp the wisdom of God’s plan. In Proverbs we read:

The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and the knowledge of the Holy One is insight.   (Proverbs 9:10)

We need to take sin seriously. The law teaches us that much.

Are we keeping score on others as did the Pharisees? This is a sure sign that we are missing the meaning of the cross. The cross was for Jesus to bear. But if we are to fully understand the power of the cross to defeat sin, we must understand that we have a cross to bear as well. Jesus said:

Then he said to them all, “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross daily and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will save it.   (Luke 9:23-24)

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