Tag Archives: high priest

Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 23

Track 1: One Thing You Lack

Job 23:1-9, 16-17
Psalm 22:1-15
Hebrews 4:12-16
Mark 10:17-31

Today, let us examine one of the costs of being a disciple of Christ. Reading from Mark’s Gospel:

As Jesus was setting out on a journey, a man ran up and knelt before him, and asked him, “Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?” Jesus said to him, “Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone. You know the commandments: ‘You shall not murder; You shall not commit adultery; You shall not steal; You shall not bear false witness; You shall not defraud; Honor your father and mother.’” He said to him, “Teacher, I have kept all these since my youth.” Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said, “You lack one thing; go, sell what you own, and give the money to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.” When he heard this, he was shocked and went away grieving, for he had many possessions.   (Mark 10:17-22)

Is Jesus telling us all to sell what we own and give the money to the poor? That might be true for some of us. The key is the phrase: “You lack one thing.” When we are concerned about growing in Christ, we need the direction of the Holy Spirit. Jesus could see that the rih man was bound by his wealth. What are we bound by?

God will tell us what we are missing ir we will listen. Like the rich man, he loves us. He wants to restore our soul and reform us in his image. We read from Hebrews:

The word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing until it divides soul from spirit, joints from marrow; it is able to judge the thoughts and intentions of the heart. And before him no creature is hidden, but all are naked and laid bare to the eyes of the one to whom we must render an account.   (Hebrews 4:12-13)

God knows us. He sees everything. Yet we must remember that Jesus is on our side. Again, from Hebrews:

Since, then, we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus, the Son of God, let us hold fast to our confession. For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who in every respect has been tested as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore approach the throne of grace with boldness, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.   (Hebrews 4:14-16)

God extends his grace and mercy to us. But we must grab it with all our being. We should not take it for granted. Nominal Christians assume all is well without laying their souls before God. Jesus paid to high a price for us not to pay any price. The Spirit gently speaks to us: “One thing you lack.” What wez lack, God generously provides through the blood of his Son. Are we seeking him? Are we listening?

 

Track 2:

Amos 5:6-7,10-15
Psalm 90:12-17
Hebrews 4:12-16
Mark 10:17-31

The Gospe speaks about a man who was rich, but was seeking the kingdom of God:

As Jesus was setting out on a journey, a man ran up and knelt before him, and asked him, “Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?” Jesus said to him, “Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone. You know the commandments: ‘You shall not murder; You shall not commit adultery; You shall not steal; You shall not bear false witness; You shall not defraud; Honor your father and mother.’” He said to him, “Teacher, I have kept all these since my youth.” Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said, “You lack one thing; go, sell what you own, and give the money to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.” When he heard this, he was shocked and went away grieving, for he had many possessions.   (Mark 10:17-22)

The rich man grieved because he did not want to give up his position. Riches have a tendency fir one to feel secure, eliminating aby fear of lack. This is a false since of security. Amos warns against this thinking.

you have built houses of hewn stone,
but you shall not live in them;

you have planted pleasant vineyards,
but you shall not drink their wine.   (Amos 5:11)

All our blessings come from God who can take them away at any time.

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