Tag Archives: Job

Twenty-Second Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 25

Track 1: The Miracle of Seeing

Job 42:1-6, 10-17
Psalm 34:1-8, (19-22)
Hebrews 7:23-28
Mark 10:46-52

Today, let us compare and contrast two very different people in the Bible. One was a very rich man who stood above his peers before God and the other was a blind beggar.

Let us first look at Job first. Though he was an honored man, God allowed Satan to severely test Job. When he complained to God, God answered him with this question: “Where were y9u when I laid tye foundation of tye earth?” His eyes were opened to the greatness of God, and Job responded:

“I know that you can do all things,
and that no purpose of yours can be thwarted.

‘Who is this that hides counsel without knowledge?’

Therefore I have uttered what I did not understand,
things too wonderful for me, which I did not know.

‘Hear, and I will speak;
I will question you, and you declare to me.’

I had heard of you by the hearing of the ear,
but now my eye sees you;

therefore I despise myself,
and repent in dust and ashes.”   (Job 42:1-6)

Job was a great man, but he did not quite understand who God was and is. God healed job and restored his fortunes twofold.

Now let us look at the blind beggar. Reading from Mark’s Gospel:

Jesus and his disciples came to Jericho. As he and his disciples and a large crowd were leaving Jericho, Bartimaeus son of Timaeus, a blind beggar, was sitting by the roadside. When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” Many sternly ordered him to be quiet, but he cried out even more loudly, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” Jesus stood still and said, “Call him here.” And they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take heart; get up, he is calling you.” So throwing off his cloak, he sprang up and came to Jesus. Then Jesus said to him, “What do you want me to do for you?” The blind man said to him, “My teacher, let me see again.” Jesus said to him, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way.   (Mark 10:46-52)

What is remarkable about Bartimaeus is that he had some understanding of who Jesus was. He knew that Jesus had descended from King David and was a promise from God. He also realized that Jesus could heal him. Thus, he did not complain about his blindness. He called Jesus “my teacher.” How many of the religious leaders of the day did that?

Bartimaeus was not rich, but he was rich in faith. Jesus said to him: “Go; your faith has made you well.”

Job and Bartimaeus were different, but they had something things in common. Though they were both afflicted, but they did not curse God. They both exercised their faith and followed the teachings of God. Bartimaeus followed Jesus on the way. Job forgave all his so-called friends ajd pra7ed for them.

How many of us who have been afflicted in some way, have grown stronger in our faith? How many of us have casts all our cares on Jesus? How many of us follow him more closely than ever. His way is the way to everlasting life.

Track 2: Suggestion

Jeremiah 31:7-9
Psalm 126
Hebrews 7:23-28
Mark 10:46-52

In the Old Testament and Gospel readings we have two events where God took the blind and gave them sight and then set the on the right path. First from Jereiaih:

See, I am going to bring them from the land of the north,
and gather them from the farthest parts of the earth,

among them the blind and the lame, those with child and
those in labor, together;
a great company, they shall return here.

With weeping they shall come,
and with consolations I will lead them back,

I will let them walk by brooks of water,
in a straight path in which they shall not stumble;

for I have become a father to Israel,
and Ephraim is my firstborn.   (Jeremiah 31:8-9)

In the Gospel Jesus heals Bartimaeus:

Then Jesus said to him, “What do you want me to do for you?” The blind man said to him, “My teacher,[a] let me see again.” Jesus said to him, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way.   (Mark 10:51-52)

Bartimaeus was blind but was made to see. When he saw he followed Jesus on the way, Jesus is the way, and the truth, and the light. The days are dark. We heed the light of Christ to follow, otherwise we are spiritually blind and and scattered as was Israel.

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Twenty-First Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 24

Track 1: Appointed by God

Job 38:1-7, (34-41)
Psalm 104:1-9, 25, 37b
Hebrews 5:1-10
Mark 10:35-45

James and John were concerned about yheir placer in yhr kingdom og God.. Jesus had been teaching them about the cross and they could not grasp what he was saying. Readinug from Mark:

James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came forward to Jesus and said to him, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” And he said to them, “What is it you want me to do for you?” And they said to him, “Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory.” But Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?” They replied, “We are able.” Then Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink you will drink; and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; but to sit at my right hand or at my left is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared.”   (Mark 10:35-40)

The othre disciples were indignant over what James and John did. Jesus explained that ministry is not about position, but service:

When the ten heard this, they began to be angry with James and John. So Jesus called them and said to them, “You know that among the Gentiles those whom they recognize as their rulers lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them. But it is not so among you; but whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all. For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”   (Mark 10:41-45)

Jesus gave up the highest position of all for our sake. Reading from PhilippiansL

Let the same mind be in you that was[a] in Christ Jesus,

who, though he was in the form of God,
    did not regard equality with God
    as something to be exploited,
but emptied himself,
    taking the form of a slave,
    being born in human likeness.
And being found in human form,
    he humbled himself
    and became obedient to the point of death—
    even death on a cross.   (Philippians 2:5-8)

Jame and John did not understand. Only God appoints us to positions of ministry, we do not appoint ourselves. This was true even of Jesus. Reading from Hebrews:

Every high priest chosen from among mortals is put in charge of things pertaining to God on their behalf, to offer gifts and sacrifices for sins. He is able to deal gently with the ignorant and wayward, since he himself is subject to weakness; and because of this he must offer sacrifice for his own sins as well as for those of the people. And one does not presume to take this honor, but takes it only when called by God, just as Aaron was.

So also Christ did not glorify himself in becoming a high priest, but was appointed by the one who said to him,

“You are my Son,
today I have begotten you”;   (Hebrews 5:1-5)

When Jesus ascended into heaven he gave us spiritual gifts and callings by the Holy Spirit:

The gifts he gave were that some would be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers, to equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ, until all of us come to the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to maturity, to the measure of the full stature of Christ.   (Ephesians :11-13)

What do we want Jesus to do for us? Dp we want position, honor, prestige, praise? Or are we willing to be servants of God and carry out the assignment he has given us for the building up the entire body of Christ, his Church? We need th unity of the Faith and not disunity caused by ambition and greed.

 

 

Track 2: Suggestion

Isaiah 53:4-12
Psalm 91:9-16
Hebrews 5:1-10
Mark 10:35-45

The disciples did not understand when Jesus taught them that he would die on a cross. Rather, they were concerned about their place in the Kingdom of God. The sons of Zebedee, James and John, asked for the highest positions. Jesus responded. Reading from Mark:

Jesus called them and said to them, “You know that among the Gentiles those whom they recognize as their rulers lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them. But it is not so among you; but whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all. For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”

Our only hope to have an important position in the kingdom of God ifs to allow his punishment on the cross to make us whole

Surely he has borne our infirmities
and carried our diseases;

yet we accounted him stricken,
struck down by God, and afflicted.

But he was wounded for our transgressions,
crushed for our iniquities;

upon him was the punishment that made us whole,
and by his bruises we are healed.

All we like sheep have gone astray;
we have all turned to our own way,

and the Lord has laid on him
the iniquity of us all.   ()

Only a Christlike nature will provide an effective witness to the Gospel of Jesus Christ. If we are just like the world, no one is going to hear the message of the cross.

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Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 22

Track 1: Sanctification and Suffering

Job 1:1; 2:1-10
Psalm 26
Hebrews 1:1-4; 2:5-12
Mark 10:2-16

Have you wvwe heard of Triumphant Christianity? What is ir” When Triumphant Christianity gets its hands on Easter, it will interrupt your pain, ignore your limp, explain away your questions and strike up the Oscars band before your lament has had time to finish. Triumphant Christianity always starts at the end of the story.

If we read forwards rather than backwards, we find that the season of Easter is about how, at the core, Christianity is a way of seeing everything for people who never got what they wanted from God, from life, from their families and friends and even from the very religion founded in the name of Jesus and his resurrection. Christianity isn’t a religion that saves us by finally bringing our dreams to life; it’s one that sustains us by keeping us afloat even when those dreams die again and again.

The Book of Job flies in the face of  Triumphant Christianity. Let us read a part of Job:

There was once a man in the land of Uz whose name was Job. That man was blameless and upright, one who feared God and turned away from evil.

One day the heavenly beings came to present themselves before the Lord, and Satan also came among them to present himself before the LordThe Lord said to Satan, “Where have you come from?” Satan answered the Lord, “From going to and fro on the earth, and from walking up and down on it.” The Lord said to Satan, “Have you considered my servant Job? There is no one like him on the earth, a blameless and upright man who fears God and turns away from evil. He still persists in his integrity, although you incited me against him, to destroy him for no reason.”   (Job 2:1-3)

This tells us that God does not destroy anyone. Satan is the one who attempts to do that. However, what God allows Satan to do may be surprising. Reading on:

Then Satan answered the Lord, “Skin for skin! All that people have they will give to save their lives. But stretch out your hand now and touch his bone and his flesh, and he will curse you to your face.” The Lord said to Satan, “Very well, he is in your power; only spare his life.”

So Satan went out from the presence of the Lord, and inflicted loathsome sores on Job from the sole of his foot to the crown of his head. Job took a potsherd with which to scrape himself, and sat among the ashes.   ( Job 1:1; 2:1-6)

Job was “blameless and upright man who fears God and turns away from evil.” Why would God allow Satan to test Job? Why should any believer have to suffer? Why do we suffer? Could suffering have a purpose?

The Apostle Paul boasted about suffering. Reading from 2 Corinthians:

To keep me from being too elated, a thorn was given me in the flesh, a messenger of Satan to torment me, to keep me from being too elated. Three times I appealed to the Lord about this, that it would leave me, but he said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for power is made perfect in weakness.” So, I will boast all the more gladly of my weaknesses, so that the power of Christ may dwell in me.   (2 Corinthians 12:7-9)

And from Colossians:

I am now rejoicing in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh I am completing what is lacking in Christ’s afflictions for the sake of his body, that is, the church   (Colossians 1:24)

Paul is suggestions that suffering has a purpose. Paul says that he was completing the suffering of Christ.

In Hebrews we read:

It was fitting that God, for whom and through whom all things exist, in bringing many children to glory, should make the pioneer of their salvation perfect through sufferings. For the one who sanctifies and those who are sanctified all have one Father. For this reason Jesus is not ashamed to call them brothers and sisters, saying,

“I will proclaim your name to my brothers and sisters,
in the midst of the congregation I will praise you.”   (Hebrews 2: 10-12)

If the Lord Jesus Christ, who was fully God bu also fully man, required suffering to be made perfect, why should we escape suffering? We are saved by the blood of Jesus. We are sanctified, perfected, through suffering.

When suffering does come, this temptation often comes with it. Satan raises this question: Is God good? The psalmist wrote

Enter his gates with thanksgiving,
    and his courts with praise.
    Give thanks to him, bless his name.

For the Lord is good;”>his steadfast love endures forever,
and his faithfulness to all generations.   (Psalm 100:4-5)

Job’s wife said to Job:

“Do you still persist in your integrity? Curse God, and die.” But he said to her, “You speak as any foolish woman would speak. Shall we receive the good at the hand of God, and not receive the bad?” In all this Job did not sin with his lips.   (Job 2:4-10)

Do we blame God for being unfair to us? Or do we keep our integrity and still give him praise? The psalmist wrote:

Give judgment for me, O Lord,
for I have lived with integrity;
I have trusted in the Lord and have not faltered.

Test me, O Lord, and try me;
examine my heart and my mind.

For your love is before my eyes;
I have walked faithfully with you.   (Psalm 26:1-3)

Amen

 

Track 2: Suggestion

Genesis 2:18-24
Psalm 8
Hebrews 1:1-4; 2:5-12
Mark 10:2-16

The Old Testament reading and Gospel reading has to do with marriage:

The man gave names to all cattle, and to the birds of the air, and to every animal of the field; but for the man there was not found a helper as his partner. So the Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall upon the man, and he slept; then he took one of his ribs and closed up its place with flesh. And the rib that the Lord God had taken from the man he made into a woman and brought her to the man. Then the man said,

“This at last is bone of my bones
and flesh of my flesh;

this one shall be called Woman,
for out of Man this one was taken.”

Therefore a man leaves his father and his mother and clings to his wife, and they become one flesh.   ()

Pharisees raised a question concerning divorce:

Some Pharisees came, and to test Jesus they asked, “Is it lawful for a man to divorce his wife?” He answered them, “What did Moses command you?” They said, “Moses allowed a man to write a certificate of dismissal and to divorce her.” But Jesus said to them, “Because of your hardness of heart he wrote this commandment for you. But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.’ So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate.”   ()

What is the viewpoint of today’s church? Why is the divorce rate the same for those in church and out of church?

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