Tag Archives: Millennial Reign

Last Sunday after Pentecost: Christ the King

Track 1: My Kingdom Is Not from this World

2 Samuel 23:1-7
Psalm 132:1-13 (14-19)
Revelation 1:4b-8
John 18:33-37

Today we celebrate “Christ the King.”” He is King of King and Lord of Lords. Do we see Jesus as our King and Lord? What does that mean?

During the earthly ministry of Jesus there was great misunderstanding about his kingship, however. In today’s Gospel reading we are given a glimpse of this misunderstanding:

Pilate entered the headquarters again, summoned Jesus, and asked him, “Are you the King of the Jews?” Jesus answered, “Do you ask this on your own, or did others tell you about me?” Pilate replied, “I am not a Jew, am I? Your own nation and the chief priests have handed you over to me. What have you done?” Jesus answered, “My kingdom is not from this world. If my kingdom were from this world, my followers would be fighting to keep me from being handed over to the Jews. But as it is, my kingdom is not from here.” Pilate asked him, “So you are a king?” Jesus answered, “You say that I am a king. For this I was born, and for this I came into the world, to testify to the truth. Everyone who belongs to the truth listens to my voice.”   (John 18:33-37)

We can understand why Pilate was confused about Jesus’ kingship. He was not a Jew. But as we read John’s Gospel we begin to see that Pilates was actually attempting to understand what Jesus was saying. In some ways, he was more inquisitive than the Jewish authorities. They had rejected Jesus as their king. He did not fit their preconceives expectation.

In their religious minds, they believed that they fully understood Judaism. They did not ned any teaching from Jesus. Their concern was to rid themselves of Roman rule.

In his testimony before Pilate, Jesus talked about two kingdoms – two very different kingdoms: the kingdom of God and the kingdom of this world. Which one is real?

Pilate asked Jesus, “What is truth?”   (John  18:38) That is the question. Which kingdom is real? There is so much untruth in the world today. There is so much untruthful being reported. But God’s Word is truth.

From the Gospel of Luke:

Once Jesus was asked by the Pharisees when the kingdom of God was coming, and he answered, “The kingdom of God is not coming with things that can be observed, nor will they say, ‘Look, here it is!’ or ‘There it is!’ For, in fact, the kingdom of God is among y0u.”   (Luke 17:20-21)

Jesus’ answer was that the kingdom of God was not coming in the manner the Pharisees were expecting. There would be no great and magnificent leader who staked out a geographical claim and routed the Romans; rather, the kingdom would come silently and unseen, much as leaven works in a batch of dough. In fact, Jesus said, the kingdom had already begun, right under the Pharisees’ noses. God was ruling in the hearts of some people, and the King Himself was standing among them, although the Pharisees were oblivious to that fact.

Jesus was telling the Pharisees that He brought the kingdom of God to earth. His presence in their midst gave them a taste of the kingdom life, as attested by the miracles that Jesus performed. Jesus was inaugurating the kingdom as He changed the hearts of men, one at a time.

For the time being, Christ’s kingdom is not of this world. One day, however, the it will be manifest on the earth, and Jesus Christ will rule a physical kingdom from David’s throne with Jerusalem as His capital – his millennial reign.

The Apostle wrote:

Grace to you and peace from him who is and who was and who is to come, and from the seven spirits who are before his throne, and from Jesus Christ, the faithful witness, the firstborn of the dead, and the ruler of the kings of the earth.

To him who loves us and freed us from our sins by his blood, and made us to be a kingdom, priests serving his God and Father, to him be glory and dominion forever and ever. Amen.   (Revelation 1:4-8)

Have we been freed from our sins by his blood? That is the only requirement for entering the kingdom of God. Today is the day of salvation. Today is the day to give praise and thanksgiving to our King.

 

Track 2: Suggestion

Daniel 7:9-10, 13-14
Psalm 93
Revelation 1:4b-8
John 18:33-37

Perhaps we could compare the prophecies of Daniel and John, the Revelator. First from Daniel:

As I watched,

thrones were set in place,
and an Ancient One took his throne,

his clothing was white as snow,
and the hair of his head like pure wool;

his throne was fiery flames,
and its wheels were burning fire.

A stream of fire issued
and flowed out from his presence.

A thousand thousands served him,
and ten thousand times ten thousand stood attending him.

The court sat in judgment,
and the books were opened.   (Daniel 7:9-10)

And from Revelation:

To him who loves us and freed us from our sins by his blood, and made us to be a kingdom, priests serving his God and Father, to him be glory and dominion forever and ever. Amen.

Look! He is coming with the clouds;
every eye will see him,

even those who pierced him;
and on his account all the tribes of the earth will wail.

So it is to be. Amen.

“I am the Alpha and the Omega,” says the Lord God, who is and who was and who is to come, the Almighty.  (Revelation 1:4-8)

How does it compare with the two Apocalyptic visions?  Daniel writes about a heavenly court which sits in judgement. In Revelation, we read:

even those who pierced him;
and on his account all the tribes of the earth will wail.

There will be an accounting of the lives of every person, before an awesome God. For Christians, that accounting was done on the cross. That is our only hope to stand before God with Jesus as our intercessor.

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Labor Day

The Dignity of Work 

Ecclesiasticus 38:27-32a
Psalm 107:1-9 or Psalm 90:1-2, 16-17
1 Corinthians 3:10-14
Matthew 6:19-24

God is our creator. He is the master craftsman of the universe. We are made in his image. Thus, a large part of our life on earth is the discovery of the God-given talent and creativity which he has placed within us. This discovery gives us joy but also contributes to the wellbeing of others.

King Solomon wrote about the skills of the potter:

He molds the clay with his arm and makes it pliable with his feet; he sets his heart to finish the glazing, and he takes care in firing the kiln. All these rely on their hands, and all are skillful in their own work. Without them no city can be inhabited, and wherever they live, they will not go hungry.   (Ecclesiasticus 38:29-32)

We are familiar with King Solomon. He was the wisest and the most wealthy ruler of his time, or perhaps of any time. Yet, Solomon found that all that material wealth was “vanity and striving after wind.” It did not satisfy. Again he wrote:

So I saw that there is nothing better than that all should enjoy their work, for that is their lot; who can bring them to see what will be after them? (Ecclesiastes 3:22)

Solomon was saving the our work itself should provide us satisfaction. The doing is more rewarding than the wages and what they can provide. Thus, whatever we do, let us do it unto the Lord, offering him praise and thanksgiving.

This Labor Day let us pause and rest. But let us also enjoy and appreciate our work and that of others. If we are still on the discovery to find our God-given vocation, we should not give us. God is with us. The psalmist wrote:

May the graciousness of the LORD our God be upon us; prosper the work of our hands; prosper our handiwork.   (Psalm 90:17)

There is great dignity in any kind of work. All work if for the betterment of society. To not work is a drag on society and on others. The Apostle Paul warned:

For you yourselves know how you ought to imitate us; we were not idle when we were with you, and we did not eat anyone’s bread without paying for it; but with toil and labor we worked night and day, so that we might not burden any of you. This was not because we do not have that right, but in order to give you an example to imitate. For even when we were with you, we gave you this command: Anyone unwilling to work should not eat. For we hear that some of you are living in idleness, mere busybodies, not doing any work.   (2 Thessalonians 3:7-11)

While on the earth Jesus never stopped working:

“My Father is still working, and I also am working.”   (John 5:17)
We must work the works of him who sent me while it is day; night is coming when no one can work. As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world.”   (John 9:4-5)
We need to follow his example. Soon the darkness will come upon us. We want to be working up to that day in the Kingdom of God. Then we will be prepared to work for him in his millennial reign.
Today, let us pause and give thanks for all our workers and citizen saints who keep us going.

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Sixth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 9

Track 1: City of David, City of God

2 Samuel 5:1-5, 9-10
Psalm 48
2 Corinthians 12:2-10
Mark 6:1-13

Dynasties seem to come and go. Today, things seem to be falling apart at the seams. But let us look at a case study of King David for understanding. Reading from 2 Samuel:

All the tribes of Israel came to David at Hebron, and said, “Look, we are your bone and flesh. For some time, while Saul was king over us, it was you who led out Israel and brought it in. The Lord said to you: It is you who shall be shepherd of my people Israel, you who shall be ruler over Israel.” So all the elders of Israel came to the king at Hebron; and King David made a covenant with them at Hebron before the Lord, and they anointed David king over Israel. David was thirty years old when he began to reign, and he reigned forty years. At Hebron he reigned over Judah seven years and six months; and at Jerusalem he reigned over all Israel and Judah thirty-three years.   (2 Samuel 5:1-5)

Unlike King Saul, David was obedient to God. As long as he kept the commandments of God, David was blessed by God. He celebrated his reign by building the city which he named after himself:

David occupied the stronghold, and named it the city of David. David built the city all around from the Millo inwards. And David became greater and greater, for the Lord, the God of hosts, was with him.   (2 Samuel 5:9-10)

The psalmist this city, but from a much broader perspective:

Great is the Lord, and highly to be praised;
in the city of our God is his holy hill.

Beautiful and lofty, the joy of all the earth, is the hill of Zion,
the very center of the world and the city of the great King.   (Psalm 48:1-2)

The city of David was to be called the city of God. We might say that David laid the foundation of the city, but we would be missing the true foundation. David’s kingdom did not remain. Jerusalem was ultimately captured and the temple was destroyed. Israel had once more turned against God and worshipped foreign gods. What lay in ruins, however, did not remain so.

God has laid a foundation for the city long before David. God made a covent promise to Abraham that he would never abandon. He showed Abraham his future city in a vision. Through Abraham never actually saw Jerusalem he looked forward to it. Reading from Hebrews:

For he looked forward to the city that has foundations, whose architect and builder is God.   (Hebrews 11:10)

Though we may not see it with our eyes right now, God is building his city in the midst of a world in decay. But a new day is coming soon.

The Apostle John was given a vision of this city:

Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth; for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more. And I saw the holy city, the new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying,

“See, the home of God is among mortals.
He will dwell with them;
they will be his peoples,
and God himself will be with them;
he will wipe every tear from their eyes.
Death will be no more;
mourning and crying and pain will be no more,
for the first things have passed away.”   (Revelation 21:1-4)

His glorious kingdom is coming. He is preparing the new Jerusalem even now. Do we see it? We will be given an early taste of his glory when we join him, by faith, He has a place for each of us in his millennial reign. The best is yet to come.

 

Track 2: Suggestions

Ezekiel 2:1-5
Psalm 123
2 Corinthians 12:2-10
Mark 6:1-13

The Old Testament reading from Ezekiel is about the calling and commissioning of the prophet. The Gospel reading has to do with calling and commissioning of the disciples. Taken together, we get of how God Equips his servants for ministry. In both cases God warns his people of the opposition they will face. But with his anointing they will prevail. Today, we have that same calling. We need that same anoiting.

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