Tag Archives: Pharisees

Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 22

Track 1: Sanctification and Suffering

Job 1:1; 2:1-10
Psalm 26
Hebrews 1:1-4; 2:5-12
Mark 10:2-16

Have you wvwe heard of Triumphant Christianity? What is ir” When Triumphant Christianity gets its hands on Easter, it will interrupt your pain, ignore your limp, explain away your questions and strike up the Oscars band before your lament has had time to finish. Triumphant Christianity always starts at the end of the story.

If we read forwards rather than backwards, we find that the season of Easter is about how, at the core, Christianity is a way of seeing everything for people who never got what they wanted from God, from life, from their families and friends and even from the very religion founded in the name of Jesus and his resurrection. Christianity isn’t a religion that saves us by finally bringing our dreams to life; it’s one that sustains us by keeping us afloat even when those dreams die again and again.

The Book of Job flies in the face of  Triumphant Christianity. Let us read a part of Job:

There was once a man in the land of Uz whose name was Job. That man was blameless and upright, one who feared God and turned away from evil.

One day the heavenly beings came to present themselves before the Lord, and Satan also came among them to present himself before the LordThe Lord said to Satan, “Where have you come from?” Satan answered the Lord, “From going to and fro on the earth, and from walking up and down on it.” The Lord said to Satan, “Have you considered my servant Job? There is no one like him on the earth, a blameless and upright man who fears God and turns away from evil. He still persists in his integrity, although you incited me against him, to destroy him for no reason.”   (Job 2:1-3)

This tells us that God does not destroy anyone. Satan is the one who attempts to do that. However, what God allows Satan to do may be surprising. Reading on:

Then Satan answered the Lord, “Skin for skin! All that people have they will give to save their lives. But stretch out your hand now and touch his bone and his flesh, and he will curse you to your face.” The Lord said to Satan, “Very well, he is in your power; only spare his life.”

So Satan went out from the presence of the Lord, and inflicted loathsome sores on Job from the sole of his foot to the crown of his head. Job took a potsherd with which to scrape himself, and sat among the ashes.   ( Job 1:1; 2:1-6)

Job was “blameless and upright man who fears God and turns away from evil.” Why would God allow Satan to test Job? Why should any believer have to suffer? Why do we suffer? Could suffering have a purpose?

The Apostle Paul boasted about suffering. Reading from 2 Corinthians:

To keep me from being too elated, a thorn was given me in the flesh, a messenger of Satan to torment me, to keep me from being too elated. Three times I appealed to the Lord about this, that it would leave me, but he said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for power is made perfect in weakness.” So, I will boast all the more gladly of my weaknesses, so that the power of Christ may dwell in me.   (2 Corinthians 12:7-9)

And from Colossians:

I am now rejoicing in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh I am completing what is lacking in Christ’s afflictions for the sake of his body, that is, the church   (Colossians 1:24)

Paul is suggestions that suffering has a purpose. Paul says that he was completing the suffering of Christ.

In Hebrews we read:

It was fitting that God, for whom and through whom all things exist, in bringing many children to glory, should make the pioneer of their salvation perfect through sufferings. For the one who sanctifies and those who are sanctified all have one Father. For this reason Jesus is not ashamed to call them brothers and sisters, saying,

“I will proclaim your name to my brothers and sisters,
in the midst of the congregation I will praise you.”   (Hebrews 2: 10-12)

If the Lord Jesus Christ, who was fully God bu also fully man, required suffering to be made perfect, why should we escape suffering? We are saved by the blood of Jesus. We are sanctified, perfected, through suffering.

When suffering does come, this temptation often comes with it. Satan raises this question: Is God good? The psalmist wrote

Enter his gates with thanksgiving,
    and his courts with praise.
    Give thanks to him, bless his name.

For the Lord is good;”>his steadfast love endures forever,
and his faithfulness to all generations.   (Psalm 100:4-5)

Job’s wife said to Job:

“Do you still persist in your integrity? Curse God, and die.” But he said to her, “You speak as any foolish woman would speak. Shall we receive the good at the hand of God, and not receive the bad?” In all this Job did not sin with his lips.   (Job 2:4-10)

Do we blame God for being unfair to us? Or do we keep our integrity and still give him praise? The psalmist wrote:

Give judgment for me, O Lord,
for I have lived with integrity;
I have trusted in the Lord and have not faltered.

Test me, O Lord, and try me;
examine my heart and my mind.

For your love is before my eyes;
I have walked faithfully with you.   (Psalm 26:1-3)

Amen

 

Track 2: Suggestion

Genesis 2:18-24
Psalm 8
Hebrews 1:1-4; 2:5-12
Mark 10:2-16

The Old Testament reading and Gospel reading has to do with marriage:

The man gave names to all cattle, and to the birds of the air, and to every animal of the field; but for the man there was not found a helper as his partner. So the Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall upon the man, and he slept; then he took one of his ribs and closed up its place with flesh. And the rib that the Lord God had taken from the man he made into a woman and brought her to the man. Then the man said,

“This at last is bone of my bones
and flesh of my flesh;

this one shall be called Woman,
for out of Man this one was taken.”

Therefore a man leaves his father and his mother and clings to his wife, and they become one flesh.   ()

Pharisees raised a question concerning divorce:

Some Pharisees came, and to test Jesus they asked, “Is it lawful for a man to divorce his wife?” He answered them, “What did Moses command you?” They said, “Moses allowed a man to write a certificate of dismissal and to divorce her.” But Jesus said to them, “Because of your hardness of heart he wrote this commandment for you. But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.’ So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate.”   ()

What is the viewpoint of today’s church? Why is the divorce rate the same for those in church and out of church?

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Tuesday in Holy Week

A Child of the Light

Holy Week reminds us of the contrast between darkness and light. Darkness was all around Jesus but He continued to radiate the light and love of God. The message that He wanted to convey to His disciples was that they should choose the light over darkness:

Then Jesus told them, “You are going to have the light just a little while longer. Walk while you have the light, before darkness overtakes you. Whoever walks in the dark does not know where they are going. Believe in the light while you have the light, so that you may become children of light.”  (John 12:35-36)

We have been called  by Jesus to walk as children of the light. Young children are often open and trusting, particularly if they are raised in a loving environment. When we get older we become more aware of our shortcomings and we may be tempted to hide them. We may want others to see through us because we know that we are not altogether pure. The Pharisees made it a practice of diverting the gaze of others from them by compounding rules that others would not be able to keep. They created darkness to obscure that fact that they were not walking in the light themselves.

While we have Jesus we should walk in Him. He extends His hand to us but we must grasp it. Though He warned the Pharisees they would not listen. All anyone can do without Jesus is a coverup. Yet darkness is only a temporary covering. Ultimately, it is no solution at all. Why should we depend upon deception when we can depend upon the truth of God? The truth of God is that he loves us and our sin has been covered by the blood of Jesus.

God’s light does not come by our good deeds. Our light is a gift and a promise which God made through the Prophet Isaiah:

“It is too light a thing that you should be my servant
to raise up the tribes of Jacob
and to restore the survivors of Israel;
I will give you as a light to the nations,
that my salvation may reach to the end of the earth.”   (Isaiah 49:6)

Jesus was and is that light. Are we will to walk with as children of the light? The psalmist wrote:

For you are my hope, O Lord God,
my confidence since I was young.

I have been sustained by you ever since I was born;
from my mother’s womb you have been my strength;
my praise shall be always of you.

I have become a portent to many;
but you are my refuge and my strength.

Let my mouth be full of your praise
and your glory all the day long.   (Psalm 71:5-8)

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Third Sunday of Advent

He Came to Testify to the Light

John the Baptist seemed to spring up out of nowhere. The religious leaders in Jerusalem were not prepared from him. Reading from today’s Gospel of John:

This is the testimony given by John when the Jews sent priests and Levites from Jerusalem to ask him, “Who are you?” He confessed and did not deny it, but confessed, “I am not the Messiah.” And they asked him, “What then? Are you Elijah?” He said, “I am not.” “Are you the prophet?” He answered, “No.” Then they said to him, “Who are you? Let us have an answer for those who sent us. What do you say about yourself?” He said, “I am the voice of one crying out in the wilderness, ‘Make straight the way of the Lord,’” as the prophet Isaiah said.   (John 1:19-23)

The Pharisees wanted to know why John was baptizing Jews. Baptism was required for Gentiles who were converting to Judaism. Jews were the rightful children of Abraham. They were the people of the Covenant. For the Pharisees the ministry of John the Baptist seemed irrelevant. Why was the ministry of John the Baptist needed? Again, reading from John’s Gospel:

Now they had been sent from the Pharisees. They asked him, “Why then are you baptizing if you are neither the Messiah, nor Elijah, nor the prophet?” John answered them, “I baptize with water. Among you stands one whom you do not know, the one who is coming after me; I am not worthy to untie the thong of his sandal.”   (John 1:24-27)

John the Baptist’s ministry was preliminary. His purpose was to testify to the light of Christ that was coming into the world. From John’s Gospel:

He came as a witness to testify to the light, so that all might believe through him. He himself was not the light, but he came to testify to the light.   ()

John the Baptist’s was twofold: He came to reveal the darkness and then to point to the One who would dispel the darkness and illuminate the world. But before the people were able to see the light, they would first have to see the darkness.

Today, are we not surrounded by darkness? The darkness seems to be advancing, not retreating. Chaos has been planned by the Prince of Darkness. What must we do? Do we look for a leader that will lead us out of all this? God does lead through his anointed ones. King David was a good example. But even David fell for short of the glory of God. He was a man after God’s own heart. But he was also an adulterer and murderer. John the Baptist was a leader sent from God, but he could not deliver the people out of darkness on his own. He pointed to Jesus.

Unfortunately, we have false prophets and false teachers in our churches today who are not pointing to Jesus. In fact, many of them are not addressing the darkness in their sermons. We have self-help, happy sermons. Before we can understand, appreciate, and fully embrace the light of Christ, we must see clearly the darkness. We must see the darkness that is within ourselves.

The Apostle Paul gives us a prescription:

Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you. Do not quench the Spirit. Do not despise the words of prophets, but test everything; hold fast to what is good; abstain from every form of evil.   (1 Thessalonians 5:16-22)

Rather than despair, we must seek the truth of God’s Word. We must seek the Word made flesh. All true prophecy points to Jesus. We must shut out the falsehood of this world. We have false prophets and we have false journalists. Everyone who does not give glory to the Lord is not of him.

Mary, the mother of Jesus proclaimed:

My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,

my spirit rejoices in God my Savior;
for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant.

From this day all generations will call me blessed:
the Almighty has done great things for me, and holy is his Name.

He has mercy on those who fear him
in every generation.

He has shown the strength of his arm,
he has scattered the proud in their conceit.

He has cast down the mighty from their thrones,
and has lifted up the lowly.

He has filled the hungry with good things,
and the rich he has sent away empty.   (Luke 1:46-53)

Jesus is our savior. Do we fear him? Have we humbled ourselves before hm? Do we hunger and thirst for his righteousness?c

The Apostle Paul blessed the Church of Thessaloniki:

May the God of peace himself sanctify you entirely; and may your spirit and soul and body be kept sound and blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. The one who calls you is faithful, and he will do this.   (1 Thessalonians 5:23-24)

Advent is a season of not only preparing for the coming of the Christ child, it is also a time of preparation for the return of the Lion of Judah. The Lamb of God who was slain for us to take away our sins, is the sovereign ruler of the age to come. Does he rule our hearts today? Are we allowing his light to deliver us from darkness? Let us take our eyes off of this fallen world for a moment and reflect upon the light of Christ that is coming into the world today. Many people are opening their eyes and hearts to One who is the true light of this world.

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